The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )

Product image 1The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 2The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 3The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 4The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 5The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 6The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 7The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 8The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 9The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 10The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 11The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 12The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 13The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 14The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 15The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 16The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )
Product image 17The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1933 - 4 ( Volume V )

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718 pages - 1933 - Used, acceptable
This huge book, which is well - illustrated with photographs and diagrams, is a record of Air British Development from 1933 to 1934.

Characteristics

Book cover finish Canvas finish, Hardcover ( square back binding )
Special features First edition, Original edition ( O.E. or Or.E )
Condition Used, acceptable
Number of pages 718
Published date 1933
Language English
Size 19 x 25 x 4.5 cm
Author Squadron Leader C.G. Burge O.B.E. - A.R.Ae.S.I. - A.M.Inst.T.
Editor SIR ISAAC PITMAN & SONS, LTD.

Description

PREFACE

AIR DISARMAMENT

 

Disarmament, and more especially that of the Air, continues to occupy the greater part of the time of the League of Nations*. The discussions, which were to have been continued in Committee, are now postponed until September. We take this opportunity of recording our observations on this important subject as briefly as we can.

 

Failing effective measures for the international control of Civil Aviation, the abolition of air forces cannot be considered, neither for that matter is any great reduction of the existing strengths of the leading Air Powers to be expected. States will be compelled to maintain air forces on a scale sufficient to safeguard their interests. Measures to limit the size of air forces and to regulate the use of aircraft by codified law are among the most practical of the proposals submitted to the conference, and these are the more likely to form the basis of an international agreement.

 

Forcible arguments can be advanced in support of the abolition of navies and armies, whose methods of waging war are no more humane, indeed in many respects less so, than those of war waged from the air. ( ... ) Where is the logic of wishing to do away with a force employing weapons which in actual fact would lead to less loss of life and suffering if war did break out ? The fact of the matter is that air invasion to some countries the advocates of abolition is the only menace with which they are threatened, whilst other countries are menaced more by invasion from the land. To these latter, whose civilian populations have learnt from bitter experience what unpreparedness means to them, the risks of air bombardment are no greater and its horrors less than those associated with invasion by land forces.

 

Let us then seek refuge in a strong air force and not gamble with sentiment. The progress of civilization is more likely to be hastened and the risk of war actually made less by allowing aviation to develop and to take its rightful position among the defence forces of the country. The alternatives are to retard human progress and to revert to wars of attrition in which the loss of life and human suffering even among the civilian population will be far more intense, not only during the war itself but in the succeeding years of peace. No restrictions upon the weapons to be employed in war are going to safeguard peace.

 

These restrictions would, more likely than not, have the very opposite effect, for they would make it easier for nations so inclined to embark upon war. ( ... )

 

* The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace ( 1920 - 1946 ).

 

( source : Wikipedia ).

À PROPOS DE CET AUTEUR
Squadron Leader C.G. Burge O.B.E. - A.R.Ae.S.I. - A.M.Inst.T.

Squadron Leader Cyril Gordon Burge M.I.D., O.B.E., A.R.Ae.S.I., A.Inst.T. ( May 10th, 1893 - 1975 ) was an early, if not the first, Adjutant to R.A.F. Cranwell College, a onetime personal assistant to Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Hugh Montague Trenchard G.C.B., O.M., G.C.V.O., D.S.O. ( 1873 - 1956 ), and the " exciting and friendly uncle " who actively encouraged the legless Ace Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader C.B.E., D.S.O. & Bar, D.F.C. & Bar, D.L., F.R.Ae.S. ( 1910 - 1982 ) to set out on his legendary career. 


Cyril Burge was educated at St. Lawrence College ( Kent, England ) and Sandhurst ( Berkshire, England ). Described as a natural " gentleman, leader & organiser ", he was commissioned into the York and Lancaster Regiment in 1913 and was posted to the Overseas Battalion in India. 


Promoted Lieutenant on October 28th, 1914, he joined the Royal Flying Corps in November 1915 and reportedly first flew as an Observer with No. 12 Squadron. Later he trained as a pilot, and saw " much of the fighting with the Royal Flying Corps over France and Flanders ". By February 1918, he had accumulated 450 flying hours, and reportedly commanded No. 100 Squadron. 


In August 1919, he was granted a Permanent Commission in the R.A.F. with the rank of Lieutenant and was subsequently appointed Adjutant at the former R.N.A.S. Air Station west of Sleaford ( Lincolnshire, England ) where the elite officer cadre of the fledgling service was to be trained. Meantime, he married Hazel McKenzie, sister to Douglas Bader’s mother. 


In the spring of 1921, Douglas Bader was invited by the Burges to spend part of the Easter holidays with them at Cranwell. Only just 13 years old, he had never been near aeroplanes before, and when the quiet, good - humoured Cyril Burge sat him in the cockpit of an Avro 504 trainer the thick hair almost vanished as the boy bent over the controls and dials like a terrier. Later he stood for hours in Cyril Burge’s garden watching the bellowing Avros taking off over his head. 


Five years later at St. Edward’s School ( Oxford, England ), Douglas Bader was cautiously considering a university career when the visit of an Old Boy then at Cranwell, reminded him of his enjoyable stay there, and he wrote at once to " Uncle Cyril " to find out about becoming a Cranwell Cadet. Cyril Burge had left the R.A.F. College but was then Personal Assistant to A.C.M. Sir Hugh Trenchard, Chief of the Air Staff, and " with the satisfaction of a match - maker, he wrote back saying that his nephew was just the type they wanted and he would do everything he could to help which from the P.A. to the C.A.S., sounded considerable. " Well primed by Cyril Burge, Douglas Bader duly presented himself before the board of interviewers for Cranwell at Burlington House ( London ) in June 1928, and successfully gave the answers " Uncle Cyril " knew the board wanted to hear. 


The following December, Cyril Burge retired from the service with a gratuity and over the next few years wrote several published works on British aviation. Following Douglas Bader’s famous crash at Woodley Aerodrome, near Reading ( Berkshire, England ), on December 14th, 1931, Cyril Burge was immediately summoned from nearby Aldershot. He reached the Royal Berkshire Hospital to find that the surgeon Leonard Joyce had removed his nephew’s right leg and that his life was hanging in the balance. The surgeon told Cyril Burge that if Douglas lasted another day he might have a chance provided the left leg did not become sceptic. 


At length Douglas Bader came round, and, examining him, Leonard Joyce recognised signs of incipient septicaeima in the left leg. With the mother close to hysteria and with no time to lose, the surgeon sought Cyril G. Burge’s permission to cut off the remaining leg. It was the only chance and Cyril Burge instantly nodded his assent. 


Squadron Leader Cyril Burge representing the Air Targets Sub - Committee of Aerial Intelligence reported that the amount of water consumed in the whole of Germany was only three times that of the Ruhr and that the bulk of it was obtained from one large reservoir contained by a single large dam known as the Möhne Dam. He added that there were also four or five other reservoirs in Germany which fed the inland waterways. The destruction of which was likely to leave the waterways high and dry which would severely effect the German transportation system. It also seemed reasonable to believe that the damage caused would be extremely difficult to put right. 


( sources : The Aviation Forum, dnw.co.uk, Wikipedia )

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