LINDBERGH ALONE

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The day after which nothing would be the same for him was Friday, May 20, 1927. That morning, alone in a little plane powered by a single engine, Charles A. Lindbergh took off from a muddy runway on the outskirts of New York.

Characteristics

Book cover finish Hardcover ( square back binding )
Special features Dust jacket
Condition New
Number of pages 216
Published date 1977
Languages English
Size 19 x 26 x 2.5 cm
Author Brendan Gill
Editor Harcourt Brace Jovanovich

Description

" The day after which nothing would be the same for him was Friday, May 20, 1927. That morning, alone in a little plane powered by a single engine, Charles A. Lindbergh took off from a muddy runway on the outskirts of New York. His destination was Paris. " So begins Brendan Gill's book about the most extraordinary feat of one of our century's most extraordinary men. 

 

With his clarity of vision and his characteristic elegance, Gill gives us in Lindbergh Alone a meditation on one man's unprecedented accomplishment, and the world's overwhelming response to it. 

 

It was not the author's intention to write a biography of Charles Lindbergh; rather, it was to observe an unknown young man at one moment in history, and to examine the forces that led him to act as he did. The 1920s was a period that sought out heroes and worshipped them extravagantly; few heroes were so unlike the age that fostered them as this " unheralded boy " of 25. A shy man, bold-hearted and firm of purpose, the Lindbergh we come to know in Gill's book is one whose intelligence and strength of will enabled him, through a single, superb act, to become perhaps the most celebrated figure of his time.

À PROPOS DE CET AUTEUR
Brendan Gill

Brendan Gill (October 4, 1914 – December 27, 1997) wrote for The New Yorker for more than 60 years. He also contributed film criticism for Film Comment and wrote a popular book about his time at the New Yorker magazine.


Gill attended the Kingswood-Oxford School before graduating in 1936 from Yale University. In 1936 The New Yorker editor St. Clair McKelway hired Gill as a writer.


As The New Yorker's main architecture critic from 1987 to 1996, Gill was a successor to Lewis Mumford as the author of the long-running "Skyline" column before Paul Goldberger took his place. A champion of architectural preservation and other visual arts, Gill joined Jacqueline Kennedy's coalition to preserve and restore New York's Grand Central Terminal. He also chaired the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and authored 15 books, including Here at The New Yorker and the iconoclastic Frank Lloyd Wright biography Many Masks.


(Sources Wikipedia – National Book Foundation)

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