ENCYCLOPÆDIA OF AVIATION

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Prix régulier 80,00 € TTC 6%

This magnificent book - which contains photographs, drawings, etc… - can be seen as a dictionnary over aviation, from its birth to its latter technical developments in the 1930's.

Caractéristiques

Format 25 x 20 x 4 cm
Nbr. de pages 642
Finition Reliure collée
Année d’édition 1935
Langue Anglais
Etat du livre Un petit peu abîmé
Auteur Squadron Leader C.G. Burge
Editeur THE NEW ERA PUBLISHING CO. LTD.

Description

Aviation book
PREFACE
This Encyclopædia is partly the outcome of the many questions asked almost daily in conversation with people in aviation, with young students and with the youth of this country, and from the hundreds of letters of inquiries which are received yearly in the offices of publishers of aeronautical journals and books, aircraft manufacturers and aeronautical institutions. The idea of this Encyclopædia was conceived many years ago, but the development of aviation generally has been so rapid during the past few years and events have moved so swiftly that it was considered inadvisable to produce a work of this magnitude until many important issues had been clarified. That position has now been reached and we are confident that in presenting the facts, ancient and modern, in a form that will make them readily understood and more easily accessible the success of this Encyclopædia is assured.
( ... ) We have endeavoured to cater for everyone interested or engaged in Aviation - the boy and girl ; the young student ; the air traveller and the user of air transport ; air - transport operators and their staffs ; manufacturers and their staffs ; commercial pilots ; private owners ; ground engineers ; airport and aerodrome staffs ; Air Force personnel ; and all those who are connected by profession with, or are merely interested in, some aspect or other of aviation. Our task at first seemed an insuperable one, but we are confident that in the main we have achieved success, and that all who come into possession of this volume will find most, and we hope all, of what they require. ( ... )
C.G.B.

Squadron Leader Cyril Gordon Burge M.I.D., O.B.E., A.R.Ae.S.I., A.Inst.T. ( May 10th, 1893 - 1975 ) was an early, if not the first, Adjutant to R.A.F. Cranwell College, a onetime personal assistant to Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Hugh Montague Trenchard G.C.B., O.M., G.C.V.O., D.S.O. ( 1873 - 1956 ), and the ’ exciting and friendly uncle ’ who actively encouraged the legless Ace Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader C.B.E., D.S.O. & Bar, D.F.C. & Bar, D.L., F.R.Ae.S. ( 1910 - 1982 ) to set out on his legendary career.
The son of a J.P. for the Cinque Ports, Cyril G. Burge was educated at St Lawrence College ( Kent, England ) and Sandhurst ( Berkshire, England ). Described as a natural ’ gentleman, leader & organiser ’, he was commissioned into the York and Lancaster Regiment in 1913 and was posted to the Overseas Battalion in India. Promoted Lieutenant on October 28th, 1914, he joined the Royal Flying Corps in November 1915 and reportedly first flew as an Observer with No. 12 Squadron. Later he trained as a pilot, and according to Douglas R.S. Bader’s biographer Wing Commander Percy Belgrave ’ Laddie ’ Lucas C.B.E., D.S.O. & Bar, D.F.C. ( 1915 - 1998 ), saw ’ much of the fighting with the Royal Flying Corps over France and Flanders ’.
By February 1918 he had accumulated 450 flying hours, and reportedly commanded No. 100 Squadron. In August 1919 he was granted a Permanent Commission in the R.A.F. with the rank of Lieutenant and was subsequently appointed Adjutant at the former R.N.A.S. Air Station west of Sleaford in Lincolnshire where the elite officer cadre of the fledgling service was to be trained. Meantime, he married Hazel McKenzie, sister to Douglas R.S. Bader’s mother.
In the spring of 1921 the boy Bader was invited by the Burges to spend part of the Easter holidays with them at Cranwell. ’ From Hazel and Cyril the welcome was warm. Only just thirteen, Douglas had never been near aeroplanes before, and when the quiet, good - humoured Cyril sat him in the cockpit of an Avro 504 trainer the thick hair almost vanished as the boy bent over the controls and dials like a terrier. Later he stood for hours in Cyril’s garden watching the bellowing Avros taking off over his head ... Cyril thought he had a convert then but he was a little premature ... ’
Five years later at St. Edward’s School in Oxford, Douglas R.S. Bader was cautiously considering a university career when the visit of an Old Boy then at Cranwell, reminded Bader of his enjoyable stay there, and he wrote at once to ’ Uncle Cyril ’ to find out about becoming a Cranwell cadet. Cyril G. Burge had left the R.A.F. College but was then personal assistant to Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Trenchard, Chief of the Air Staff, and ’ with the satisfaction of a match - maker, Cyril wrote back saying that Douglas was just the type they wanted and he would do everything he could to help which from the p.a. to the C.A.S., sounded considerable. ’ Well primed by Cyril G. Burge, Douglas R.S. Bader duly presented himself before the board of interviewers for Cranwell at Burlington House in London in June 1928, and, ’ trying not to sound to well rehearsed ’, successfully gave the answers ’ Uncle Cyril ’ knew the board wanted to hear.
The following December, Cyril G. Burge retired from the service with a gratuity and over the next few years wrote several published works on British aviation.
Following Douglas R.S. Bader’s famous crash at Woodley Aerodrome, near Reading, on December 14th, 1931, Cyril G. Burge was immediately summoned from nearby Aldershot. He reached the Royal Berkshire Hospital to find that the surgeon Leonard Joyce had removed Douglas R.S. Bader’s right leg and that his nephew’s life was hanging in the balance. Cyril G. Burge was given a room for the night, and twice when it seemed that Bader was dying was called to the patient’s room but on each occasion Douglas R.S. Bader rallied.
In the morning, his nephew was still alive but had not recovered consciousness since the amputation of his largely severed right leg. Joyce told Cyril G. Burge that if Douglas lasted another day he might have a chance provided the left leg did not become sceptic. At length Bader came round, and, examining him, Leonard Joyce recognised signs of incipient septicaeima in the left leg. With Douglas’s mother close to hysteria and with no time to lose, the surgeon sought Cyril G. Burge’s permission to cut off the remaining leg, warning him that his nephew would certainly die if the leg stayed, and that he would probably die from operative shock if they tried to take it off. It was the only chance and Cyril G. Burge instantly nodded his assent.
Squadron Leader Cyril G. Burge representing the Air Targets Sub - Committee of Aerial Intelligence reported that the amount of water consumed in the whole of Germany was only three times that of the Ruhr and that the bulk of it was obtained from one large reservoir contained by a single large dam known as the Möhne Dam. He added that there were also four or five other reservoirs in Germany which fed the inland waterways. The destruction of which was likely to leave the waterways high and dry which would severely effect the German transportation system. It also seemed reasonable to believe that the damage caused would be extremely difficult to put right.
( sources : The Aviation Forum, dnw.co.uk, Wikipedia )
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