HAREN - EVERE AIRFIELD : Metamorphoses of a Landmark in Belgian Aviation History

Product image 1HAREN - EVERE AIRFIELD : Metamorphoses of a Landmark in Belgian Aviation History
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Well - illustrated with photographs, line drawings and maps, this fine book tells the story of the Haren - Evere Airfield ( near Brussels, Belgium ), from its construction during the First World War to the late 2000's.

Characteristics

Book cover finish Offset varnish, Perfect paperback
Special features First edition
Condition Good
Number of pages 159
Published date 2008
Language English
Belgian Aviation Yes
Size 19 x 21 x 1.1 cm
Author Sven Soupart
Editor AAM ÉDITIONS

Description

It was during the First World War that Brussels' first airfield came into being. The German occupying forces transformed a rural site on the outskirts of the suburbs into an airship base for conducting bombing and observation missions in France and England.

 

After the Armistice, the Belgian Army made this its main airfield, which it soon shared with the first Belgian aviation companies, S.N.E.T.A. and later S.A.B.E.N.A. Airplanes flew routes from this airfield to France, England, Germany and Scandinavia. In 1925, Edmond Thieffry departed from here on his daring fifty - one - day flight to the Congo. It took another ten years before passengers were able to reach the colony in just five days on board the new larger, faster, more comfortable airplanes.

 

Changes in the airfield's facilities and in its terminal mirrored the rapid developments in civil aviation. The various airfield services were first set up in isolated buildings and later were quickly grouped together. While the new terminal that was inaugurated in 1929 still looked like a train station, its reinforced concrete extension added three years later fitted perfectly into the modernist style that was popular in those days. Deserted by airplanes long since, the site is now being prepared to accommodate the new N.A.T.O. Headquarters.

À PROPOS DE CET AUTEUR
Sven Soupart

Sven Soupart is graduated in History from the Free University of Brussels ( Université Libre de Bruxelles, U.L.B., Belgium ). As an Air Force officer, he has worked at the Royal Museum of Army and Military History ( Musée Royal de l'Armée et d'Histoire Militaire, M.R.A. ). Seconded by the Defense to the U.L.B., he has collaborated with the Archives of the City of Brussels ( Archives de la Ville de Bruxelles, A.V.B. ) on the exhibition Brussels 14 - 18, From day to day, a city at war. Sven soupart has also published La Belgique et la Première Guerre mondiale ( with Pierre - Alain Tallier, M.R.A. ) and Le journal de guerre de Paul Max ( with Benoît Majerus, A.V.B. ). 


( source : www.eyrolles.com )

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