FAMOUS AIRCRAFT : THE DOUGLAS DC-3

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The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed (207 mph) and range (1,500 mi) revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Its lasting effect on the airline industry and World War II makes it one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made.

Caractéristiques

Format 21 x 28 x 0.2 cm
Nbr. de pages 30
Finition Agrafé
Aviation belge Oui
Année d’édition 1964
Langue Anglais
Etat du livre Bon état
Auteur Len Morgan

Description

The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed (207 mph) and range (1,500 mi) revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Its lasting effect on the airline industry and World War II makes it one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made. The major military version, of which more than 10,000 were produced, was designated the C-47 Skytrain in the USA and the Dakota in the UK. This book, part of the Famous Aircraft Series, contains a detailed pilot's report, 81 photographs, 23 scale drawings, a two-page action scene, and the actual Flight Handbook issued to DC-3/C-47 pilots during World War II.


Albert George Leonard (’Len’) Morgan (March 23, 1922 – March 11, 2005) was an American aviator, writer, publisher, entrepreneur, photogrammetrist, and investor.
Early life and education
Len Morgan was born in West Terre Haute, Indiana. He was the son of British immigrants, father John (’Jack’) Kingsley Morgan, a Presbyterian Minister and mother Juliet (’Jill’) Freda née Gardner Morgan, a homemaker. He graduated from high school in Louisville, Kentucky in Spring, 1941.
 
Canadian and US military service
Len Morgan left for Canada to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force in his late teens. He, along with eleven others from the United States, earned his RCAF Wings on November 21, 1941. After the attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S.' entry into World War II, he transferred to the United States Army Air Forces in Egypt and flew in Africa and the Middle East. He attended college at the University of Louisville, on the G.I. Bill, during the 1947 and 1948 school years, following the war. He continued flying for the Kentucky Air National Guard until 1949.
 
Photogrammetrist
From 1946 through 1949, while serving in the Kentucky Air National Guard, Morgan worked for Park Aerial Services, Inc., of Louisville, Kentucky. His position with the firm was photogrammetrist. In this position, he used photogrammetry to make maps from aerial images.
 
Braniff International Airways
One of the P-51 Mustangs he flew for the Kentucky Air National Guard was ’borrowed’ to travel to a short-notice job interview with Braniff International Airways in Dallas, Texas, in 1949. Morgan flew for Braniff for over 33 years.
 Airman Morgan rose to the Captaincy of every aircraft type that Braniff International Airways flew during that period, from the Douglas DC-3 to the Boeing 747. From 1949 until shortly before the 1982 cessation of operations, Braniff pilots operated British Airways and Air France Concordes on cooperative interchange flights between Dallas and Washington, DC. The planes, owned by BA/AF and in their respective liveries, then took on BA/AF crews and continued on to London and Paris, respectively. Captain Morgan did not participate in this operation, however, preferring to remain as Captain of the Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet.
 Mr. Morgan possessed a Federal Aviation Administration issued Airline Transport Pilot certification with Type Ratings in the Convair 340/440, Lockheed L-188 Electra, Boeing 707 and 720, Boeing 727, and Boeing 747 aircraft.
 
Aviation author
During and after his airline career, Morgan wrote over thirty books and hundreds of magazine articles on a wide variety of aviation subjects. In 1955, he founded Morgan Aviation Books that specialized in the publication of aviation and airline related subjects. Morgan operated his publication firm until 1975. During this time and until his retirement in 1999, he continuously authored various books and articles.
 Morgan's best selling book that he personally authored was titled The P-51 Mustang from the Famous Aircraft Series of books. The P-51 Mustang sold over 50,000 copies.
 His monthly column, ’Vectors’, was a prominent feature of Flying magazine for over twenty years. An accomplished storyteller, he wrote not only of airplanes but also shared gentle wisdom about the people and experiences he encountered over his flying career. Richard L. Collins, former editor of Flying, eulogized, ’[Morgan] was as eloquent as anything ever published in Flying. . . In his last ’Vectors’ column in 1999, Len closed with a reflection on his bond with the readers. 'So, good friends, it was good knowing all of you. Goodbye, wherever you are.'’
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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